Isagenix Reviews – Does The Name Spell Scam?

Are you looking to quit your day job and just start making money from home? Well, you can stop wondering at this point. The Internet offers so many opportunities for you to do so, and it’s not hard to find one that suits your tastes and other preferences. Of the many opportunities to make money that you can find online, one of the few that would catch your attention is perhaps multilevel marketing. This is not strange, seeing as how multilevel marketing or MLM companies market their money-making opportunities as though it were a product. MLM, as we all know, is a retail business that heavily relies on growing a hierarchic network of distributors to make money. Now of the many companies that employ this business model, one that you’d perhaps come across with is the well-known supplement company Isagenix.

Many look at multilevel marketing with suspicion due to its association with the pyramid scam, a classic type of Ponzi scheme. Isagenix gets a fair amount of such suspicion for that matter. That Isagenix could possibly be nothing more than a pyramid scheme with supplement products is probably the though that made you to look for reviews of the company, a search that ended up leading you to this humble little blog.

Part of our purpose is to put such suspicions to a close, and bring you nothing more than an honest assessment of MLM companies and the like. In this article, we will give Isagenix the proper review treatment it deserves as Isagenix reviews go, so as to put your doubts to rest. Ready? Here goes our review.

First Off: What Is Isagenix?

Isagenix International LLC is a multilevel marketing company responsible for supplements and personal care products such as IsaLean, Ionix Supreme, Amped, Whey Thins, Rejuvity, and a whole lot more. The company was founded by the enterprising team of John Anderson, Jim Coover, and Kathy Coover. The company is currently based in Gilbert, Arizona. Thanks to their shrewd use of the MLM business model, the company now has the strength of 200,000 direct sales associates.

Isagenix boasts a huge roster of personal care and dietary supplement products, ranging from workout supplements to diet shakes. Their products have received fair Isagenix reviews on the Internet, but that’s not what we are going to look into in this review. Rather, we will get into the legitimacy of the company itself, with regards to the money making opportunity that they offer.

Is It Not a Scam?

Now here’s the million dollar question: Is Isagenix a scam that only intends to suck money out of its distributors? Without much ado, the answer is no. Unlike Ponzi schemes and pyramid scams, Isagenix actually has a sustainable source of revenue that will keep the company going even if it stops growing its number of distributors.

Allow us to explain further. Ponzi schemes and pyramid scams do not really have any real source of income. The people leading these shifty “businesses” make money from the investments of every single people that enter their network. These new members are then encouraged to bring in more people, who will then invest money that will serve as compensation to their recruiters and everyone else on the upline.

Isagenix, on the other hand, actually has products that cater to a certain market—the billion dollar health and wellness niche—and that actually sell. These products are Isagenix’s primary source of revenue. While distributors are essential to the company and are required to keep the whole MLM business going, Isagenix can simply pull the plug off of their recruiting machine and will still earn money until their current distributors finally retire.

Will Isagenix Not Rip You Off?

Now that the question as to whether or not Isagenix is a scam is all cleared up, let us get into the very meat of this matter: Isagenix’s compensation system. Before we proceed, though, let us first look into the process of registering as a direct sales associate for Isagenix.

Isagenix encourages prospecting associates to start off as customers and experience the company’s products firsthand. A positive experience with Isagenix can easily translate to effective marketing, which is essential to anyone looking to sell the company’s dietary and personal care products. Now there are two ways to get started: one is to get in touch with your nearest Isagenix distributor, or connect directly with the company through their website.

Unlike most MLM companies, it does not take any amount to join Isagenix beyond the money that you will be paying for their products, for which you will have a nice 10% discount. You can further lower the price by 25% by signing up as a preferred customer, but that will require you to pay a recurring annual membership fee of $39, or $29 if you decide to sign up to their automatic shipments.

That’s it. You can then get started selling Isagenix products. You can then make money in the following ways:

  • As a seller. You get paid by your personal business volume, or the commissions that you get for every product sale. This is the most basic way to earn money.
  • As a leader of your own network. You get to earn money from the total business volume that everyone in your downline has managed to accumulate.
  • Rank bonuses. In Isagenix, you are given a rank that increases according to your personal sales volume. You get paid according to your rank as a reward for your efforts; the higher your rank is, the bigger the bonus you get.
  • Team bonuses. As a team, members of your organization will also receive a bonus in accordance to the entire team’s effort. The more sales your team makes, the higher the reward is.

The catch, however, is that you will need to remain active in selling Isagenix products, or when it comes to guiding your organization into making sales. Here’s the deal, though: staying active can cost you about $100 to $400 per month, and sometimes, this can be considerably more than you’ve earned for the last 30 days. You have to work hard and sell a lot if you are looking to make actual money from your commissions, and all hopes of turning this opportunity into a source of residual income is out of the question.

Indeed, it can be difficult to make money with Isagenix, unless you dedicate a lot of time selling the company’s products and managing your network, as well as more money to get more products that you can sell. The statistics for 2015 and 2016 don’t help either: only one in every 2,500 Isagenix distributors made over $50,000—a substantive income—in each of those years.

One way to make this work for you if you are looking to sell Isagenix products from home is to sell online. You can then employ well-known affiliate marketing strategies like upselling to make big money from your Isagenix commissions. Of course, this will require some investment in your part, but if done well, it should be all worth it.

Isagenix certainly is not a scam, as some biased Isagenix reviews would like to posit. Furthermore, the company does offer pay the compensation their members are due, which further takes us away from the thought that the company could be a ripoff. However, likely due to the size of Isagenix’s distributor network, it has become harder to make a substantive income selling the company’s products these days, not unless you go unorthodox routes or dedicate a huge chunk of your waking hours turning your venture into a full-fledged Isagenix distribution business.

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